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Zoom admits to shutting down activist accounts at the request of the Chinese government

Zoom's successful video chat service during the COVID-19 pandemic closed three accounts at the request of the Chinese government to build memorials for victims of peaceful protests. At Tiananmen Chowk on 4 June 1989

Zoom‘s successful video chat service during the COVID-19 pandemic closed three accounts at the request of the Chinese government to build memorials for victims of peaceful protests. At Tiananmen Chowk on 4 June 1989.

As Axios first reported, the video communication service has shut down the accounts of Li Cheouk-Yan, Wang Dan and ou Ou Feng Xuo to plan and organize vigils and events in memory of the Tiananmen Square acacia.

According to Zoom’s own timeline, the Chinese government has informed the company about four large, June 4 memorial gatherings that are being promoted on social media. The Chinese government has demanded that zoom meetings be terminated and the accounts hosted. Responding to a request by the Chinese government, Zoom said that three of the four incidents involved China from the mainland and that Chinese law was aware of or discussed illegal events.

Zoom in on those meetings.

The company has also discontinued host accounts, which are based in Hong Kong and the US.

Zoom said in its statement that the company’s decision to not block participants in the country was wrong. The company agreed, “We can assess its need.

To correct its deficiency, Zoom said the technology will evolve over the next few days, which will enable us to eliminate or prevent participation at a geographic basis. This helps us comply with local authorities’ requests when they decide that the functionality of our platform is illegal within its borders; However, we are able to protect these conversations for participants outside the permissible boundaries of functionality. ”

Zoom attributed its decision to introduce the Chinese government as a result of its operations as an international company. “We hope that one day governments will create barriers to separate their people from the world and recognize each other that they are acting against their interests, as well as their citizens and all human rights,” the company wrote in a statement. “Reality is zoom-driven and is expanding in more than 80 countries. It has to comply with local laws with zoom to promote the exchange of ideas.”

This is not the first time that the company has questioned Zoom’s privacy and security policies or its very friendly relationship with the Chinese government. The company has also been blamed for routing some of its calls through China, when the practice was first reported in April.

The company has previously acknowledged that much of the technology development is taking place in China, and that security issues will be eliminated from governments. Both Taiwan and India have banned the application for government use, and the US government and the German foreign ministry are restricting the use of the app for government purposes.

Despite all the security flaws and criticism, the use of zoom has skyrocketed. It now offers streaming video communication services to over 300 million users.

Full details of the company are given below:

We hope that one day, governments will be creating barriers to separate their people from the world and to act against one another’s own interests, the rights of their citizens and all of humanity. The reality is that Zoom operates and continues to expand in more than 80 countries, and zoom must comply with local laws as it seeks to promote public thinking. ”

In recent articles in the media, we have questioned our commitment to the exchange of ideas and conversations openly about the negative activities towards Li Cheuk-Yan, Wang Dan and Ou Fou Fengshuo. To be clear, if their accounts are renewed and moving forward, we will have a new process

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